Veterinary

Pride Veterinary Centre performs heart defect operation on spaniel

The Cardiology team at Pride Veterinary Centre has recently performed an unusual procedure to alleviate a congenital heart defect obstructing the blood flow back to the heart. 

This was the first time Pride Veterinary Centre has undertaken this procedure, which is rare in both human and veterinary medicine. Chester, a Springer Spaniel aged seven months was referred to Pride Veterinary Centre for investigation of abdominal distention and ascites detected by the referring vet. 

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He initially saw the internal medicine team due to suspicion of a hepatic problem but was then passed to the Cardiology team for further investigation and treatment. 

Rachel Blake, veterinary cardiologist at Pride Veterinary Centre said: “Diagnosis was made on echocardiography, which identified the congenital heart defect cor triatriatum dexter, resulting in right-sided congestive heart failure.” 

The Cardiology team at Pride Veterinary Centre initially treated Chester with oral medications to control his right-sided congestive heart failure. 

Once this was achieved, Chester underwent balloon dilation of the cor triatriatum dexter which allowed his medications to be stopped. During this procedure, a balloon catheter is inserted through the femoral vein to the right atrium.

Blake worked alongside members of the anaesthesia and diagnostic imaging teams, and with the assistance of an external Veterinary Cardiologist on this uncommon procedure. 

She adds: “Having a multi-disciplinary referral service is key to the success of procedures such as this balloon dilation. We rely heavily on the expertise of our colleagues, both vets and veterinary nurses.”

Blake joined the Cardiology service in May 2019 and has added interventional cardiology procedures to the range of referral services available at Pride Veterinary Centre. 

This condition is rare in both humans and animals and the procedure was a first for Pride Veterinary Centre. 

She said, “We are very pleased with Chester’s recovery. The procedure went well and we have been getting updates on his antics at home. He is certainly a lively fellow and we are so happy to see him live his very best life post-procedure.”

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