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Cat crisis at London rescue centre

A London rescue centre is having a cat crisis as over 30 cats have been dumped in boxes or carriers, left on the doorstep or in the reception in September alone.

 

The Mayhew Animal Home has been inundated with cats and kittens that have been dumped at The Home by owners who say they are no longer able to keep their cats.

The impact of dumped cats at The Mayhew means that there is no capacity for serious welfare cases to come into The Home and it is now a crisis situation.

Zoe Edwards, animal welfare manager, says: “If owners called us in the first instance, we can help in many other ways rather than the last resort of them dumping their pet on us.

“Owners dumping their cats have told us that they cannot afford to feed them. If this is the situation they are facing, we can help with food supplies. Where pet owners are having difficulty, we urge them to contact us first and we will see what we can do to help. We are here to assist and advise pet owners on the best course of action for their pet.”

 

Currently there are eleven cats living in a garden, abandoned by a family who have moved away leaving their cats behind.

The Mayhew’s Animal Welfare Officer Team is visiting the cats daily to feed and check on them, however, because of the overflow of dumped cats at The Mayhew they cannot be brought into The Home due to the lack of space.

Zoe added: “Of course we are doing what we can by closely monitoring and feeding the eleven cats, however, we cannot bring them in until we can find space to accommodate them.

“This is the impact that irresponsible owners have on our rescue centre. When owners dump perfectly healthy cats on us without seeking help from us first, it means we cannot rescue cats that are in urgent need.

“The attitude of these owners has been that it’s not their problem. We want to get the message out that pet owners should call us first before taking such drastic action as there are many other ways that we can help to find a solution in the best interests of their pet.”

Cats that have been dumped at The Home during this month include one year old femalecat, Mina, Zebedee, a male cat abandoned in a cardboard box with a note attached, and

Tina who had a spay wound and was dumped in a cat carrier next to The Home’s dustbins. Recent cats in emergency situations that The Mayhew’s Animal Welfare Officers have rescued are Forlatt, a skinny and frightened two year old cat dumped in a cemetery and left to fend for herself and Jennifer, a kitten, who was found dumped at Willesden bus depot.

Because of the critical situation on their capacity, The Mayhew is appealing for foster carers who can help foster a cat or kitten. When a cat or kitten is fostered, it frees up space in the centre so that more emergency welfare cases can be taken in and therefore more animals helped.

Georgina Disney, cat welfare co-ordinator, says: “We urgently need more foster carers to take care of the cats and kittens that come into us in their own homes. We provide everything that’s needed and it’s a rewarding way to help us.

“The more foster carers we have, the more sick, injured and abandoned animals in need we can take in, help and rehome.”

If you are interested in becoming a foster carer call 020 8916 8000 or go to www.themayhew.org/get-involved/foster/

 

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